Category Archives: Health

Are You Ready to Retire? It’s About More than Money

We found this interesting article just published on the US News “Money” website. It points out something we frequently tell our clients: preparing for retirement is about much more than money.

The article is called “How toTell if You’re Ready to Retire.” It poses five simple questions you (and your spouse if you’re married) should be asking yourself when deciding the right time to take the retirement leap. Here’s what we found especially interesting: of the five questions, only one is directly related to your income, even though financial preparation seems to be the number one thing most retirees focus on. So – besides money, what else should you be thinking about?

The first question this article asks is a simple one that too many retirees overlook: “Do you have something else to do?” In other words, how will you fill your days once you’re no longer heading off to work five days a week?  The time to consider how to use those leisure hours is now, before you find yourself aimless and bored with too little activity filling up too many hours. Part-time work, volunteering or a time-consuming hobby can all be part of the solution.

The second question involves money – indirectly. But it actually involves a trade-off of income versus freedom by asking, “Are you ready to pass up more money for more freedom?” There are many ways to calculate the income you’ll need in retirement, and we’ll be happy to help you work through those calculations, but the real issue is how much your retirement freedom is worth to you. This can make a big difference in deciding on your income goals.

The third question in the “retirement calculus” involves family. The question is, “Do you want to spend more time with your family?” In this case “family” may include your spouse, your adult children and – perhaps most likely – your grandchildren. The US News article quotes one Stanford University study that showed “spending time with grandchildren” as a major reason for retirement for 60 percent of adult respondents. It also points out one caution: make sure you and your spouse have the same ideas about spending more time together, because this can create marital friction after retirement unless you’ve talked it through. Generally husbands want to spend more time with their wives, but wives don’t necessarily feel the same!

The fourth question may seem counterintuitive: “How is your health?” The answer to this question can cut both ways. Some choose earlier retirement because a chronic health condition may reduce their life expectancy and they would rather enjoy their remaining years free from the rigors of regular work. For others, employer-provided health insurance for oneself or a spouse is a major reason to keep working. One thing’s for sure: more than two-thirds of retirees, according to the article, say stress is a significant factor in deciding when to retire. That can have a major impact on your health, perhaps making retirement a more attractive choice.

The last question is the one that seems most obvious, and it’s both the simplest and the most complex: “Can you afford to retire?” No need to go into detail here.

As with every one of these questions, along with a host of others, the best way to chart a course into your retirement years is to make a carefully-considered plan – or as we call it, a LifePlan. It’s your blueprint to help you build a happier, healthier future as you age. A LifePlan can help you avoid unplanned institutional care, and allow you to preserve and protect your assets no matter how long you live. It can also help you avoid becoming a burden to your loved ones. But where do you start? How do you prepare your own individualized LifePlan?

We have the perfect starting place: simply attend one of our free LifePlanning Seminars. We conduct these information-packed seminars frequently, at locations throughout the region. You can find out dates, times and locations by clicking on the Upcoming Events tab found on this website. Bring your questions! At the end of the seminar, you’ll have a much better view of the road ahead.

We’ll look forward to working with you!

(originally reported at http://money.usnews.com)

Seniors: Looking for More Joy and Better Health? Try Gardening!

When we think about staying healthy as we age, we tend to focus our attention on medical insurance, prescription drug benefits and finding a physician who understands the medical needs of seniors. These are important, of course – but let’s not overlook one of the most basic, most important aspects of healthy aging: staying active. Maintaining an active lifestyle can be the number one prescription for a healthy retirement.

And one of the best ways to stay active? The answer may surprise you. It’s gardening.

Do an Internet search for “Gardening and Senior Health” and you’ll find article after article extolling the benefits of digging in the soil, planting seeds, pruning and weeding. We liked this article from the website Caregiver Stress.com, called Gardens Brighten Seniors’ Lives. It’s a few years old, but the information is timely and clear: for many seniors gardening can be the key to both physical and mental well-being.

Anyone who loves gardening – an estimated three out of four Americans – knows that part of the benefit is emotional. The article quotes Rebecca Kolls, host of a nationally syndicated gardening show on television. Kolls says, “There’s a nurturing aspect in gardening where you take a seed and coddle it.” She adds, “Seniors have given up child rearing, so gardening gives them baby plants and seedlings again. It’s a new way of caring for something.”

Then there are the physical benefits of gardening. Thanks to the bending, stretching and kneeling of gardening, you’ll discover health advantages including improved muscle tone, lower blood pressure and a gently increased heart rate. Another article cited the benefits of activities like planting seeds, pulling weeds, and pruning flowers, calling them “great occupational therapy activities.” Seniors who rake leaves or plant trees and shrubs enjoy improved balance better heart health. (Of course you should check with your doctor before you begin physical activity.)

If there are so many benefits, why don’t more seniors garden? Many feel they no longer can, because of increasing frailty. But one of the wonders of gardening is that the gardener can still enjoy the seeds and the soil and the flowers even if the garden is a tiny plot, a window box or a pot on a deck or patio. If you’re interested in learning how seniors can keep on enjoying the relaxation, the joy and the beauty (not to mention the health benefits) of gardening, here’s another article you’ll find helpful: it’s called Gardening Tips for Seniors. Click on the title to read the piece.

Our goal here at Aging Options is to counsel our clients in every aspect of a healthy, secure retirement. That includes maintaining your independence as long as you can, so that you can enjoy the quality of life you’ve always dreamed about as you age. Your physical health is, of course, just one aspect of a retirement plan that can stand the test of time: you’ll also need to consider your housing options, your legal affairs, your family dynamics and your financial preparations.

Sound complicated? It doesn’t have to be, when you have the right guide to help you prepare your plan. For a perfect way to find out more information, plan to attend one of our free LifePlanning Seminars, held throughout the area. Click on the Upcoming Events tab for dates and times. Or if you prefer a personal appointment, contact us. It will be our pleasure to work with you to plant the seeds for a fruitful retirement plan.

(Originally reported at www.caregiverstress.com)

 

 

One Tip for a Healthier Diet: Spice It Up!

Sometimes as they age, people cut back on spicy foods. Turns out that could be a mistake, according to a recent article on the website Grandparents.com. This article lists at least five proven health benefits of spicy foods – some of which may surprise you. Click here to read this entertaining and tasty article.

The benefits of spicy foods come from hot peppers such as jalapeño and chilis which are rich in a compound called capsaicin. According to Dr. Cary Presant from City of Hope Hospital in California, quoted in the article, capsaicin not only helps in relieving pain but it can also aid the immune system and even boost longevity. Another spice to consider adding: turmeric, commonly used in Indian foods such as curries. The ingredient in turmeric, called curcumin, has actually been shown to reduce inflammation and even prevent cancer.

The first of the five benefits listed in the article is one that should be of interest to most of us: weight loss. Eating hot peppers increases body heat which can boost your metabolism, so you actually burn calories more quickly. Another related benefit: a research study from Purdue University shows that eating spicy foods actually reduces your appetite so you eat less.

A second benefit of hot peppers is the reduction of heart disease. Capsaicin dilates the blood vessels, thus aiding circulation, and also helps prevent blood clots. Turmeric appears to help reduce cholesterol and even reverse blood vessel damage. In other words, a little spice does the heart good, it seems!

The third benefit listed is longevity. This surprising claim is drawn from a joint Chinese and American study of 500,ooo participants in China which found that people who ate spicy foods multiple times each week reduced their risk of premature death by 14%.

As mentioned above, the fourth benefit is cancer prevention. “Curcumin has astonishing effects in cancer cells,” the article quotes Dr. Cary Presant from City of Hope. “There is good laboratory evidence that it works in reducing the growth of cancer cells and preventing them as well.” Among the cancers that capsaicin and curcumin help combat: breast cancer, cervical cancer and prostate cancer.

Finally, the article states that the compounds in spicy foods can help with pain relief. Many ointments that reduce the pain of arthritis or other inflammation of the joints contain capsaicin, which has been proven to be effective in pain reduction.

How much spicy food should you eat, and how often? The article gives some good guidelines and also suggests how to incorporate these helpful compounds into your diet even if you have a sensitive digestive system. (A hint: cooking or sauteeing peppers makes them more palatable but doesn’t rob them of their health benefits.) And one more note: black pepper isn’t the same as red pepper. And red bell peppers aren’t the same either: no capsaicin.

At Aging Options we want to be your guide as you plan for a healthy retirement. What’s the best way to begin? We invite you to attend one of our LifePlanning Seminars where we’ll provide a blueprint for a retirement plan that covers all the key aspects: health, finances, housing, legal affairs and family relationships. Click on the Upcoming Events tab on this website and you’ll find all the dates and times of seminars in your area. We’ll look forward to meeting with you soon!

(Originally reported at www.grandparents.com)

New York Times Article Asks, “Where Are the Geriatricians?”

As professionals who deal with aging adults, we are always interested to read about new services and new products geared toward seniors. In many ways American society seems to be adjusting creatively to the fact that our nation is aging. Marketers in particular seem to have grasped the fact that, by the year 2030, about 31 million Americans will be older than 75 – the largest number ever in U.S. history.

However, there’s one glaring exception to this trend of accommodating seniors. A recent article in the New York Times asks a question we’ve been asking with increasing urgency: “As the population ages, where are the geriatricians?”

This compelling article shines a spotlight on one of the real paradoxes in today’s medical landscape. As the Times puts it, “Geriatrics is one of the few medical specialties in the United States that is contracting even as the need increases, ranking at the bottom of the list of specialties that internal medicine residents choose to pursue.”

Here at Aging Options we’ve advised thousands of clients of the importance of having a geriatric specialist as part of their team of medical advisors. “A geriatrician,” to quote the Times, “is a physician already certified in internal or family medicine who has completed additional training in the care of older adults.” Besides clinical care, “geriatricians are skilled in navigating the labyrinth of psychological and social problems that often arise in the aging population.” While some traditional physicians deny the need for geriatric specialists, those in the practice state that the special needs of seniors absolutely dictate the requirement for special training and certification to properly care for older patients.

According to statistics in the Times article, there are about 7,000 geriatricians in practice today in the United States.  In the next 14 years the U.S. is going to need almost twice that many to meet the need. But because geriatricians earn less than other specialists, and because other specialties may offer more prestige, not enough medical students are gravitating toward geriatrics. Still, though, there are encouraging signs that this trend may be slowly changing as medical schools begin to train health care professionals “to see older patients through a geriatrics lens.”

If this issue is important to you – and we hope it is – we have some trusted local geriatricians to whom we can refer you. We also hope you’ll allow us to be your guide as you plan for a rewarding and secure retirement. That includes not only medical planning but other pillars of a solid plan: financial preparation, housing options, family dynamics and legal affairs.

One excellent way to begin the planning process is to attend one of our free LifePlanning Seminars. These are information-packed sessions that will provide you with a wealth of information to help launch your retirement planning process. Click on the Upcoming Events Tab on this website for dates, times and locations. Of course, if you prefer an individual appointment, it will be a pleasure to meet with you. Contact our office and we will arrange a mutually convenient time.

(Originally reported at www.nytimes.com)

Some Seniors Get Too Little Health Care – but Others Get Too Much!

A recent article on the website www.everydayhealth.com caught our eye – and should be required reading for anyone concerned about appropriate levels of health care for the seniors they love. Written by national health expert Dr. Sanjay Gupta, this article asks a very important question: “Are Seniors Getting Enough Medical Care or Too Much?”  Click here to read the entire article.

The premise behind the question, says Dr. Gupta, is straightforward: “Some older patients receive aggressive treatments that may cause more harm than good,” he writes. “Others may be undertreated because treatment risks are perceived to outweigh potential benefits.” The key, medical experts agree, is balance.

According to Veterans Administration physician Dr. Eve Kerr, many seniors actually receive more medical treatment than they should, partly because well-meaning doctors don’t always take the time required to personalize their healthcare. Some drugs can also pose a problem for seniors, because the effects of many prescription drugs can change as patients age. Dr. Kerr suggests older patients regularly review with their doctors whether to continue taking medications at the same doses – and (we would add) take a loved one or trusted friend with you if necessary, to make certain the patient’s needs are clearly communicated and the doctor’s instructions clearly understood.

“Patients get used to a certain set of goals and medications,” she says. “Sometimes it’s okay to change [medications] as our body changes when we age.” The article quotes Dr. Kerr’s assessment that medications for conditions like osteoporosis, depression, and diabetes should be re-evaluated periodically.

No matter whether the aging patient is a loved one, or you, there are several safeguards you should know about to make certain you’re getting the right level of care – not being over-prescribed, and not being neglected. That’s why we encourage you to read Dr. Gupta’s article. It could be a lifesaver for you or someone you love.

Of course, there’s more to retirement than making sure you’re making the right health care choices. Are you prepared to make the appropriate housing choices? Are your legal affairs in order? Do you have a financial plan that will allow you to protect your assets in retirement? Are your loved ones part of your retirement decisions? We cover all these aspects of retirement, and much more, at our free LifePlanning Seminars. Why not plan to join us soon? Click on the Upcoming Events tab on this website and you’ll see all the upcoming dates, times and locations. We’ll look forward to having you there!

If you would like to make an appointment for a personal appointment, please contact our office. It will be a pleasure to serve you!

(Originally reported at www.everydayhealth.com)

Should You Eat Like Quarterback Tom Brady? Maybe!

One of the oldest quarterbacks in the NFL, New England Patriot Tom Brady (age 38), is still one of the best in the game. What’s his secret?

Well, he probably has more than one, but lately a lot of attention has been paid to Brady’s unusually strict diet – an anti-inflammatory diet that some writers have termed “bizarre,” “super-strict” and even “kind of miserable.” But least one nutritionist says Brady’s diet, while far more rigorous than anything most of us could follow, actually makes a lot of sense – and each of us could learn from the superstar quarterback’s nutritional discipline.

A recent article about Brady’s diet and its advantages appeared on the Blog of the AARP. You can read the entire article here.

Brady and his wife, working with their personal chef, developed a diet designed to reduce or eliminate virtually all dietary sources of inflammation, a culprit recently linked to all sort of maladies from joint pain to cancer. The basics of the diet sound simple: 80% is vegetable-based, with the remaining 20% coming from lean meats. But it’s the severe restrictions that have raised some eyebrows. For example: Brady eats no white sugar or white flour. He avoids inflammatory foods from the nightshade family, including tomatoes, eggplant, peppers and mushrooms. He drinks no coffee or other caffeinated drinks, eats no dairy and consumes very little fruit. These are all foods that can aggravate inflammation, so Brady avoids them.

As we said, many have called the Brady Diet harsh, even impossible. But preventive medicine expert Dr. Roxanne Sukol with the Wellness Institute at the Cleveland Clinic, feels otherwise. As the article quotes her, “[Brady] is doing a great job of protecting his health.” In a recent interview, Sukol stated, “He’s eating a very nourishing diet that’s primarily whole food–based.”

So is the Brady Diet for all of us? Sukol says no – but we can learn from the superstar athlete. While not everyone needs to follow all of Brady’s restrictions, “He may have set the bar higher because the stress and strain on his system is much higher than for the rest of us,” Sukol states.

As we deal with our senior clients, we hear a common refrain: they all want to maintain their health as long as they can, so they can enjoy a great quality of life and avoid becoming a burden to their loved ones. So if good health is the goal, what are the take-aways from the Brady Diet that apply to each of us, especially as we age? How can we adjust what we eat in order to live longer and healthier? Dr. Sukol lists several relatively simple things we can all do.

First, she says, cut the processed foods from your diet. They’re the source of up to 90 percent of your body’s inflammation.

Second, cut way down on sugar. And if you must have a sweet treat, homemade is always better than a cookie out of a package. Sugar in all its various forms has been linked to inflammation in several recent nutritional studies.

Third, if you think a particular food is bothering you, stop eating it completely for two weeks. If you feel better, you’re probably on to something. This trial and error method can be a good way of eliminating foods that are adding to your body’s inflammation and related diseases.

Finally, don’t expect perfection in your dietary discipline. As the AARP article states, “We probably make a thousand food-related decisions a day. If you can improve half of those decisions – more fruits and vegetables, for example – you’ll feel better and your pants will fit better.”

Improving our clients’ quality of life in retirement is one of our paramount goals. This applies not only to your health but also your finances, your housing choices, your legal affairs and your family relationships. If you’re starting the process of planning for your retirement years, we hope you’ll start by attending a free LifePlanning Seminar – a fast-paced, highly enjoyable event where we’ll cover important elements of a solid retirement plan. You’ll find the dates, times and locations of our next group of LifePlanning Seminars on the Upcoming Events tab on this website.

So please join us at our next LifePlanning Seminar. We’ll look forward to meeting you at a seminar soon!

(Originally reported at http://blog.aarp.org)

 

 

 

Tens of Millions of Americans Severely Impacted by Health Care Bills

According to a very recent survey, tens of millions of Americans – including both the uninsured and those with insurance – face severe financial hardship each year due to medical bills. This survey, conducted by the New York Times and the Kaiser Family Foundation, was summarized in an eye-opening article we found on the blog of the Wall Street Journal.

Click here to read this just-published article, written by Kaiser Family Foundation President Drew Altman.

Altman points out that in recent years most of the attention in the arena of health care has centered on the Affordable Care Act (also known as Obamacare), with its focus on providing coverage for the uninsured. Yet millions of Americans, including those already insured, are finding that the cost of uncovered medical care is severely affecting their ability to meet other financial obligations. About one third said they were having trouble paying for basics such as housing, food or heat because of medical bills.

As one would predict, the largest share of Americans reporting serious problems with health care costs – just over half of those surveyed – were those without insurance. But about one-quarter of those who have coverage that comes with high deductibles say costs are creating severe difficulty. Even among those with household incomes between $50,000 and $99,000, the figure is the same: about one-quarter report that uncovered health care expenses have caused serious financial issues.

The biggest culprit, in two-thirds of cases, is the one-time or short-term medical crisis, where costs typically include unplanned hospital stays and emergency room visits. Another source of the financial strain is cost incurred when a policy-holder uses doctors or hospitals that are out of the insured’s network, with many respondents reporting they did not know they were in an out-of-network facility when they received care.

How big is the financial burden? Just over forty percent of respondents reported they had incurred uncovered medical bills over $2,500; one respondent in eight had incurred $10,000 or more in uncovered costs.

The bottom line, says Altman, is that the issue is not going away. He writes, “Adequacy of health insurance will become more pressing with so many Americans experiencing problems paying medical bills each year and as deductibles and other forms of cost sharing continue to increase.” The push toward higher deductible plans with more out of pocket costs will exacerbate the problem many Americans face.

For our clients, protecting assets and avoiding becoming a burden to your loved ones are central to a good retirement plan. But how can you do that as you age? Let us show you how. We have helped many hundreds of people achieve the peace of mind that comes from a sound retirement plan, and we would love to do the same for you. As a solid next step, why not join us at an upcoming LifePlanning Seminar? These information-packed gatherings are free, and we conduct them throughout the Puget Sound area.

Simply click on the Upcoming Events tab, find the seminar of your choice, then bring your questions. We’ll give you excellent tools to get you started on the road to a plan that takes all the major issues of retirement into account. Then if you wish we will gladly meet with you personally to help you bring your plan t0 completion. We hope to see you soon!

(Originally reported at http://blogs.wsj.com and the website of the Kaiser Family Foundation)

How Long Will You Live? Lifespan Calculator Gives Possible Answer

Whenever we sit down with clients to plan for their retirement, it’s always interesting finding out their answer to a simple question: “How long do you expect to live?”

Clearly none of us knows the future, but the predicted answer to this simple question carries a lot of weight. That’s because a critical aspect of retirement planning is making certain you don’t outlive your resources – something that happens to far too many seniors who fail to plan for a longer-than-expected life span. After all, if you expect to live to age 80 – and spend your money with that in mind – what will you do if you end up living to be 90? It happens more than you think, forcing seniors into decisions they never wanted to make.

For a fun (and eye-opening) exercise, spend a few minutes online with the Lifespan Calculator.  This simple tool asks several key questions about your family history, your diet and exercise habits, and your present health. It’s completely confidential – you don’t enter your name or any other identifying information. In less than five minutes you’ll discover your likely longevity.

Of course, while the calculator is predictive, it’s not 100% scientific. As we said, no one knows the future. But careful planning requires that we think ahead ten, twenty or thirty years, and do our best to lay plans in place today for a more secure tomorrow. Planning ahead has been the hallmark of the wise throughout the ages. The Old Testament book of Psalms, for example, contains these words: “Teach us to number our days that we may gain a heart of wisdom.”

We encourage you to use the Lifespan Calculator as both a fun and a sobering exercise. If nothing else it will remind you to take seriously the need to plan carefully for your future as you age. Here at Aging Options, our approach to planning encompasses five key areas of concern: your finances, your health, your legal affairs, your housing decisions and the relationships with those closest to you. It is possible to put a plan in place that takes all of these into consideration so that, no matter how long you live, you can enjoy the kind of fruitful life you have desired for yourself in your retirement years.

The place to begin is by attending one of our free LifePlanning Seminars. We conduct these information sessions frequently at locations throughout the region. You’ll gain valuable insight into the entire retirement planning process. Click on the Upcoming Events tab for dates and times. We’ll look forward to meeting you at a LifePlanning Seminar soon!

New York Times Article says Lack of Geriatricians is a “Crisis Brewing”

Here in the U.S., our population is aging – but the number of geriatric care specialists is declining. And that spells a brewing health care crisis among seniors, according to a recently published article in the New York Times. You can access the article here.

We have repeatedly emphasized how important it is for seniors to have a proper medical team, including the expertise of a geriatric care physician, or geriatrician. The New York Times article provides a dramatic illustration. It describes the author’s aging father and how the care of a geriatrician saved him from empty, drab institutional living. For anyone who wants to avoid unplanned institutional care as they age – and that’s just about everyone – this article and other resources we’ve cited in our Resource archive (click here to access our archive) is both encouraging and sobering.

The encouragement comes from the results geriatricians can achieve for their patients. “Good geriatric care can make an enormous difference,” the Times article states. “Older adults whose health is monitored by a geriatrician enjoy more years of independent living, greater social and physical functioning, and lower presence of disease. In addition these patients show increased satisfaction, spend less time in the hospital, exhibit markedly decreased rates of depression and spend less time in nursing homes.” We’ve been talking about these advantages for years!

But the sobering news is this: there’s a growing shortage of geriatric care physicians in America. The American Geriatric Society suggests that we should have one geriatrician for every 300 aging people. But projections show that, in 2030, the U.S. will have one geriatrician for every 3,800 seniors! There are currently only about 8,000 practicing geriatricians in the country, and that number is declining.

Fortunately, here at our practice we have established relationships with geriatric care physicians in our area. Contact us for details, or come to one of our Life Planning Seminars to learn more about this vital component to your health care planning. Click on the Upcoming Events tab on this website for dates and times of seminars in your area.

(Originally reported at www.nytimes.com)

If You’re Retired, Stop Feeling Guilty about Your Leisure Time!

Recently we found this article on the website www.seniorslist.com. It spoke to an issue that we suspect many retirees sometimes experience: they feel guilty about having too much leisure time!

The author, a retiree named Burton Widener, describes the tendency many retirees have to make themselves sound busier than they really are. When well-meaning friends ask, “So what are you doing with all that leisure time?” the first response is usually to do what Widener says he does. “I found myself reciting long lists of things I did to fill my spare time,” he writes, “and my most common answer always included an assurance that I was really busy and didn’t have a lot of free time. The truth of it was, I had plenty of free time on my hands, but somehow I was uncomfortable saying so.”

In his perceptive article, Widener asks why retirees are so reluctant to admit that they often have plenty of unstructured leisure time. The reason, he theorizes, is that saying you’re not busy “seems to be in conflict with what was expected of us during our working careers. For most of our adult life we were expected to put in eight to ten hours a day at our jobs, 8 hours of sleep and any free time left after that was expected to be occupied with family time or household chores.” He adds, “Idle time during the working day usually meant unemployment with all the stigma and stress that goes with it. It’s hard to break out of that thinking mode after thirty or forty years.”

As this article concludes, retirees have worked hard for many decades and have earned the privilege of some free time – so Widener’s advice is “to stop worrying about how to occupy your leisure time and just relax. Stop thinking you need to reassure others that you are always busy with something or another.” He emphasizes that, if you can simply admit that there are times you truly get to do whatever you please, “you will find you will enjoy it even more. After all, you earned it, so enjoy it.”

We think this is helpful advice. As you prepare for retirement, taking into account your finances, your health care needs, your housing preferences and other important elements of a good plan, make sure you also do some “soul searching” concerning how being retired might make you feel. If you’ve always been a “doer” in the workplace, suddenly finding yourself with more time on your hands than you’ve ever had before can be jarring! So talk with other retirees, discuss it with your spouse, and think through some of the emotional aspects of being retired. The author and psychologist Wayne Dyer once put it this way: “If you are what you do, then when you don’t, you aren’t.” Don’t let this be your state of mind!

To begin the process of planning for a productive and secure retirement, come to one of our LifePlanning Seminars offered at no cost in locations throughout the area. (Click on the Upcoming Events tab for details.) We’ll walk with you through the elements of a solid retirement plan – your legal plan, your housing options, your financial needs, your health care choices and your family engagement. We’ll help you approach retirement with newfound confidence.

Then someday when a friend asks you how you spend your time in retierement, you can smile and say – without guilt – “Simple! Sometimes I do whatever I please!”

(Originally reported at www.seniorslist.com)

Category Archives: Health

Are You Ready to Retire? It’s About More than Money

We found this interesting article just published on the US News “Money” website. It points out something we frequently tell our clients: preparing for retirement is about much more than money. The article is called “How toTell if You’re Ready to Retire.” It poses five simple questions you (and your spouse if you’re married) should…

Seniors: Looking for More Joy and Better Health? Try Gardening!

When we think about staying healthy as we age, we tend to focus our attention on medical insurance, prescription drug benefits and finding a physician who understands the medical needs of seniors. These are important, of course – but let’s not overlook one of the most basic, most important aspects of healthy aging: staying active….

One Tip for a Healthier Diet: Spice It Up!

Sometimes as they age, people cut back on spicy foods. Turns out that could be a mistake, according to a recent article on the website Grandparents.com. This article lists at least five proven health benefits of spicy foods – some of which may surprise you. Click here to read this entertaining and tasty article. The…

New York Times Article Asks, “Where Are the Geriatricians?”

As professionals who deal with aging adults, we are always interested to read about new services and new products geared toward seniors. In many ways American society seems to be adjusting creatively to the fact that our nation is aging. Marketers in particular seem to have grasped the fact that, by the year 2030, about…

Some Seniors Get Too Little Health Care – but Others Get Too Much!

A recent article on the website www.everydayhealth.com caught our eye – and should be required reading for anyone concerned about appropriate levels of health care for the seniors they love. Written by national health expert Dr. Sanjay Gupta, this article asks a very important question: “Are Seniors Getting Enough Medical Care or Too Much?”  Click…

Should You Eat Like Quarterback Tom Brady? Maybe!

One of the oldest quarterbacks in the NFL, New England Patriot Tom Brady (age 38), is still one of the best in the game. What’s his secret? Well, he probably has more than one, but lately a lot of attention has been paid to Brady’s unusually strict diet – an anti-inflammatory diet that some writers…

Tens of Millions of Americans Severely Impacted by Health Care Bills

According to a very recent survey, tens of millions of Americans – including both the uninsured and those with insurance – face severe financial hardship each year due to medical bills. This survey, conducted by the New York Times and the Kaiser Family Foundation, was summarized in an eye-opening article we found on the blog…

How Long Will You Live? Lifespan Calculator Gives Possible Answer

Whenever we sit down with clients to plan for their retirement, it’s always interesting finding out their answer to a simple question: “How long do you expect to live?” Clearly none of us knows the future, but the predicted answer to this simple question carries a lot of weight. That’s because a critical aspect of…

New York Times Article says Lack of Geriatricians is a “Crisis Brewing”

Here in the U.S., our population is aging – but the number of geriatric care specialists is declining. And that spells a brewing health care crisis among seniors, according to a recently published article in the New York Times. You can access the article here. We have repeatedly emphasized how important it is for seniors…

If You’re Retired, Stop Feeling Guilty about Your Leisure Time!

Recently we found this article on the website www.seniorslist.com. It spoke to an issue that we suspect many retirees sometimes experience: they feel guilty about having too much leisure time! The author, a retiree named Burton Widener, describes the tendency many retirees have to make themselves sound busier than they really are. When well-meaning friends…